13 March 2016

The Right Kind of Sticky

At one point in my post-secondary education, I took a class on working with gifted students. As college students, we took turns modeling different types of differentiated lessons with our peers. I really don't remember much about the details, except for this one example where the "teacher" asked us to think of words that "described how the soldiers at Gettysburg felt." And the first word that popped into my head was sticky. Apparently, this was not the sort of feeling that the facilitator had in mind.

I was thinking about this story earlier this week because I have been pondering sticky ideas---and, in particular, what we do with the ones that have become old and gummy, but are still hanging on long past the time we have moved to something better.

I had the privilege of attending the Tapestry Conference this week. As far as I could tell, I was the only K - 12 educator there. That's not surprising, given that it was not a conference for educators. It's goal was to bring together people who use data to tell stories. The most common question I was asked was "Are there others like you---in other districts?" This was a hard question to answer. Yes, there are people who work with assessments in every district (no matter how small), but the data part only comes into play once districts reach a certain size...and even then, I haven't run across very many who tell data stories.

Instead, I see lots of spreadsheets that are coded in shades of red, yellow, and green. This is a sticky idea---and one which might have been the best option 8 - 10 years ago, but it is certainly not considered best practice (let alone effective) now. And yet, it's so ubiquitous that I don't know how we will ever manage to shift away from it. Are we really so frightened of change that we would rather to hang onto the only thing we know than make sure we have the best option available? What does it say about us when we work in a profession devoted to learning and yet we are unwilling to learn and adapt?

I understand how comfortable it is to be in a box of your own design. Whatever passes for normal in ones' world is what gets maintained. I am certainly guilty of choosing safe over new. I'm trying to stretch more this year. Tapestry was one way to do that, and Eyeo will be next. There are all sorts of education-specific conferences I love to attend. I learn a lot of things that support my day-to-day work. But I can't pretend that there isn't more out there to explore or learn. I can go to a data conference and find things to apply to my work. I can learn to unstick myself from routines and ideas, at least for a little while. How do I help others do the same?

5 comments:

Jenny said...

At some point when we are in the same geographic location, I really want to sit down and talk data viz with you. I have so much to learn and you inspire me. But I'm lazy so I need your help!

The Science Goddess said...

I think we would have a good exchange of ideas. I know you use Google for running records and other data capture. Win-win!

Frank McGowan said...

Disclosure - I am a spreadsheet shader. I would like to say that I haven't shifted due to a lack of knowing better systems out there instead of the fear. What is considered best practice? What systems are the best to use as a classroom teacher? Thanks!

The Science Goddess said...

Welcome, Frank!

I will put a post together to address your questions. What we'll try to do is show some ways to leverage how your brain processes visuals so that you get more meaning out of your spreadsheets.

Logan Mannix said...

Frank, thanks for asking the question. That is what i'm thinking as well. I'm looking forward to the next post!