30 March 2016

Kick It Up a Notch

Muriel Rukeyser says that The universe is made of stories, not atoms. As a scientist, I might disagree. But as an educator working with data and children, I am inclined to draw that same conclusion.

I tell stories with data all the time. It's my responsibility to look for connections and identify patterns. For the most part, however, it's focused on those tales that I am asked to tell. What are the characteristics of students who are never able to meet the standards? Does better attendance lead to better achievement outcomes? Which schools or programs best support closing the achievement gap?

We are data rich, and information poor, in my district. Perhaps you are in yours, too. So for next year, I am planning a new challenge: Ten data stories in ten months. But I don't want these to be our regular stories, such as how students performed on the spring assessments. Instead, I am looking to use some untapped sources of data.
  • For example, a month of use of the district board room. Are there connections between our stated goals and priorities and how we use this resource? How do we use time, which seems to be the most precious commodity? 
  • Or perhaps I could dive into the class of 2017 with the lens of those students who spent all 13 years in our district. 
  • What would a text analysis of a month of school newsletters reveal?

I need at least seven more ideas like these. I'd like a few "spares" because I don't know how many will be viable once I get into the actual project.

These stories will be told in two ways. First, I plan to use a bulletin board at the district office to display some offline data. I like the idea of data you can touch. Can I use different grits of sandpaper to indicate different levels? What about some 3-D paper techniques, like you'd see in a pop-up book, to illustrate change? There will be a companion web page for every data story---something that those with online access can explore to get details.

I hope to get a jump start on these over the summer. Ten is an ambitious goal...perhaps I might have to back off from that. I chose ten because we have school during ten months of the year...and we have ten schools. Perhaps December and June will be "short stories" given the number of actual school days in each.

I am excited to kick things up a notch. I have seen any number of schools with a "data wall," but none who have data stories. What stories would you want to see about your school or district? Where would you shed some light or reveal some data? What are the questions no one seems to ask about your classroom or students?

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