11 April 2005

The Grand Finale

District Scope and Sequence planning ends tomorrow. We'll polish up our recommendations and bring out the data. I've heard that the one of the Superintendent's favourite phrases is "What's your evidence for that?" Fair enough. If he throws down the gauntlet, we'll be ready to show why full year science is needed at each grade level and each school.

We've been told that tomorrow's presentation is simply "informal," but even so, I'd like to make as many friends as possible for our cause.

I talked to some of my students today about this work. One kid had asked if biology was going to be required of incoming students---because he hadn't had it and had struggled on the state science test a couple of years ago. So, I gave him (and the others) a rather long-winded explanation of our current scope and sequence process. They seemed to appreciate it.

It was really good to be back at school with the kids again. They are so good at boosting my energy and enthusiasm---even though I felt physically exhausted by the end of the day. Speaking of, other thoughts in my head will just have to wait until tomorrow.

1 comment:

Rob said...

> If he throws down the gauntlet, we'll be ready to show why
> full year science is needed at each grade level and each school.

It amazes me that this is even in question. Is it possible that the Superintendent himself is as ignorant of science as the general population?

I'm constantly amazed that so many of the people around me don't know the most simple concepts of science, such as the difference between energy and power. Or the inverse-square law of electromagnetic radiation (had an interesting discussion with a college student about cell phones and radiation that made it clear that the college student believed that the signal left the cell phone and went directly to the cell tower antenna - somehow knowing the way - with no decrease in power). Or the cube-square law for volume versus surface area. You miss so much of the world around you if you don't know these things.

It will never happen, but it would be fun to see what would happen if the Superintendent were to be forced to pass the state science test. Perhaps then he would see the wisdom of teaching science full-time.